Oxycontins



OxyContin Purdue Pharma's painful medicine

8/17/2016
03:05 | Olivia Holiday
Oxycontins
OxyContin Purdue Pharma's painful medicine

What the strange saga of Purdue and its $3 billion drug ls us about our national dependence on painkillers. FORTUNE -- We have become a.

Purdue’s breakthrough would be one of marketing rather than medicine. The painkiller in OxyContin was not remoy new. The patent had run out decades before, and the generic form was sold by a number of companies. Its active ingredient was oxycodone, a strong, partly modified form of an opiate alkaloid called thebaine invented in Germany in 1916.

Long before Purdue was penalized by the government, the company sensed that the extent of OxyContin abuse and addiction threatened its franchise.

OxyContin's gone, but Canada's pill-popping problem is worse than

12/21/2016
07:35 | Madison Holmes
Oxycontins
OxyContin's gone, but Canada's pill-popping problem is worse than

OxyContin's off the market, its tamper-resistant replacement tougher to get. But Canadians are popping more pills than ever: In 2010, for the first.

Read more: One company, two drugs, two takes on pill safety.

The past decade has given her a crash course in pharmacology and the politics of health-care policy. She sat in a Brockville, Ont. courthouse to watch an inquest into a pair of opioid overdose deaths and has spent the past year with doctors, police officers, bureaucrats and pharmacists trying to hammer out a solution. And she’s had enough of national strategies with no teeth behind them.

A year after provincial governments clamped down on the most notorious name in prescription-drug abuse, other, more powerful, less regulated opioids are filling the void – with sometimes fatal results.

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David Juurlink doesn’t see things quite the same way.

The difference in strengths can cause confusion even for medical professionals: Last year, a northwestern Ontario man died of an apparent opioid overdose after his doctor gave him an incorrect prescription when switching him off of OxyContin.

Giudice-Tompson has been waiting for action on prescription-drug addiction since her son Michael died in 2004, killed by a drug his doctor gave him.

How OxyContin's Pain Relief Built 'A World Of Hurt' NPR

3/12/2016
02:55 | Ethan Adamson
Oxycontins
How OxyContin's Pain Relief Built 'A World Of Hurt' NPR

He focuses in particular on OxyContin, how it came to be prescribed for chronic pain, what the consequences have been, and how it became a.

Barry Meier's A World of Hurt is being released by The New York Times Co. as an e-book. The New York Times hide caption.

Meier's previous book, Pain Killer, was published in 2003. He explains that for patients, part of the danger when it comes to the long-term medical use of painkillers like OxyContin comes from the body's ability to develop a tolerance for it.

Prescription painkillers are among the most widely used drugs in America. In the decade since New York Times reporter Barry Meier began investigating their use and abuse, he says he has seen the number of people dying from overdoses quadruple — an increase Meier calls "staggering.".

Barry Meier's A World of Hurt is being released by The New York Times Co.

Harder-to-abuse oxycontin doesn't stop illicit use -- ScienceDaily

6/15/2016
01:25 | Madison Holmes
Oxycontins
Harder-to-abuse oxycontin doesn't stop illicit use -- ScienceDaily

A reformulation of OxyContin that makes it less likely to be abused than the older formulation has curtailed the drug’s illicit use. But researchers have found that a significant percentage still abuse the drug despite package labeling that emphasizes its abuse-deterrent.

The abuse-deterrent formulation was introduced in 2010 at a time when 45 percent of study participants entering drug treatment reported they had used OxyContin to get high at least once in the previous 30 days. Two years later, the percentage of those who got high with the abuse-deterrent form of the drug in the month before entering a treatment center had fallen to 26 percent.

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Surveying almost 11,000 drug users at 150 drug-treatment facilities in 48 states, the researchers found that an abuse-deterrent formulation of the prescription drug OxyContin was successful in getting abusers and addicts to stop using the drug, but only to a point.

Cicero, also vice chairman for research in the Department of Psychiatry, explained that of those who had stopped using OxyContin and switched to another drug, 70 percent started using heroin instead.

Company studying OxyContin's effect in children The Chart

11/20/2016
06:25 | Ethan Adamson
Oxycontins
Company studying OxyContin's effect in children The Chart

The maker of the prescription painkiller OxyContin confirms that a clinical trial is currently underway to measure the opioid's effects in children.

"The studies are evaluating the safety of OxyContin tablets in these young patients and the way the drug is absorbed, broken down and eliminated to see if there are any significant differences from the way the drug is handled by adults."

The study will include 154 children. To qualify for the study, patients must be between the ages of 6 and 17, have moderate to severe pain, and have already demonstrated a tolerance to opioid painkillers. "These children have diseases such as cancer or sickle-cell anemia, post-operative pain, injuries such as severe burns causing this degree of pain," said Jim Heins, senior director for public affairs at Purdue Pharma.

"Whether the results are positive or negative, we feel it is beneficial for clinicians who are treating pediatric patients with chronic, moderate to severe pain to have access to this information in scientific publications and in the product’s label, so they can make better decisions about the care of their patients," said Heins.

The maker of the prescription painkiller OxyContin confirms that a clinical trial is currently underway to measure the opioid's effects in children.

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