Oxycontin manufacturer



OxyContin manufacturer reaches 600 million plea deal over false

11/14/2016
02:21 | Hannah Hoggarth
Oxycontin manufacturer
OxyContin manufacturer reaches 600 million plea deal over false

On May 10, federal prosecutors announced fines and a plea agreement against OxyContin producer Purdue Pharma for illegally “misbranding”.

Considering that the FDA has no authority to impose penalties for violations by pharmaceutical companies, these assurances do not carry much weight. Currently, the agency negotiates with pharmaceuticals over drug marketing tactics, using approval status as leverage. This has little to do with the actual science of medicine development, and how the public is affected by a drug that has federal approval.

As the Vioxx scandal in 2004 underscored, the dangers posed by conflict of interest to the public are enormous.

Purdue Pharma

3/6/2016
06:59 | Olivia Holiday
Oxycontin manufacturer
Purdue Pharma

Purdue Pharma makes pain medicines such as hydromorphone, oxycodone, fentanyl, codeine, and hydrocodone. It is widely known for the production of drugs such as MS Contin, Oxycontin, and Ryzolt. In 1972, Contin (a controlled drug-release system) was developed.

In September 2015 the company announced it would acquire VM Pharma, gaining access to worldwide development and commercial rights to an allosteric selective tropomyosin receptor kinase inhibitor program – specifically the Phase II candidate VM-902A. The deal could generate more than $213 million for VM Pharma.

On October 4, 2007, Kentucky officials sued Purdue because of widespread Oxycontin abuse in Appalachia. A lawsuit filed by Kentucky then-Attorney General Greg Stumbo and Pike County officials demanded millions in compensation.

In 1952, the company was sold to two more doctors, Raymond and Mortimer Sackler, who relocated to the business to Yonkers, NY.

Purdue Pharma

4/7/2016
05:49 | Joshua Addington
Oxycontin manufacturer
Purdue Pharma

In 2012, New England Journal of Medicine published a study that found that "76 percent of those seeking help for heroin addiction began by abusing pharmaceutical narcotics, primarily OxyContin", and draws a direct line between Purdue's marketing of OxyContin and the subsequent heroin epidemic in the US. When Oxycontin was released in 1996, it was marketed as having lower abuse potential than immediate-release oxycodone because of its time-release properties even though there was no scientific evidence backing that conclusion.

Oxycontin Lawsuit

8/11/2016
01:09 | Matthew Adderiy
Oxycontin manufacturer
Oxycontin Lawsuit

Oxycontin (also known as Oxycodone) is used to relieve moderate to severe pain. Users of the drug file Oxycontin lawsuits against the manufacturer, typically.

Regardless of why Oxycontin lawsuits are filed, litigation seeks a uniform result—renumeration for pain and suffering, lost wages from missed work and medical expenses. Users of the drug file Oxycontin lawsuits against the manufacturer, typically for underreporting the aforementioned risks or against their respective doctors for negligently prescribing the medication. Oxycontin lawsuits, because of the drug’s severe side effects and addictive qualities, are not uncommon. Until 2004, no Oxycontin lawsuit was successfully pursued against Purdue Pharma.

OxyContin sales put Purdue's Sackler family on Forbes rich list

12/15/2016
03:31 | Matthew Adderiy
Oxycontin manufacturer
OxyContin sales put Purdue's Sackler family on Forbes rich list

According to Forbes, the Sacklers--who in 1952 bought a small New York drug manufacturer that would eventually become Purdue.

Today, like back then, features that can cut the risk of addiction are central to the drugmaker's plans. Last November, it won FDA approval for Hysingla after demonstrating that it could prevent users from abusing it orally and through snorting or injection. That gave it a leg up on fellow all-hydrocodone rival Zohydro, which is still working to snag a label update that boasts abuse-deterrence.

According to Forbes, the Sacklers--who in 1952 bought a small New York drug manufacturer that would eventually become Purdue Pharma--are worth a "conservative" $14 billion, ranking their fortune at No.