Oxy drug



Oxycontin Uses, Side Effects & Warnings

3/5/2016
05:58 | Olivia Holiday
Oxy drug
Oxycontin Uses, Side Effects & Warnings

Severe asthma or breathing problems; a blockage in your stomach or intestines; or. an allergy to any narcotic pain medicine (such as methadone, morphine, Oxycontin, Darvocet, Percocet, Vicodin, Lortab, and many others), or narcotic cough medicine that contains codeine, hydrocodone, or dihydrocodeine.

Oxycodone can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while you are using this medicine.

Keep the medication in a place where others cannot get to it. Selling or giving away OxyContin to any other person is against the law. Never share OxyContin with another person, especially someone with a history of drug abuse or addiction. Oxycodone may be habit forming.

See also: Side effects (in more detail).

If you use OxyContin while you are pregnant, your baby could become dependent on oxycodone.

Drug Abuse Oxycodone Effects

8/10/2016
12:08 | Olivia Holiday
Oxy drug
Drug Abuse Oxycodone Effects

Oxycodone is an opiate drug and can cause a serious addiction. Here are some of the effects that it has on a person when taking it and how you can help.

Of course, many people begin abusing oxycontin they got illicitly. They will follow the same path develop a tolerance and need more, and face severe withdrawal symptoms if they quit using the drug.

Find out how the Narconon program can help bring back someone you lost to OxyContin or oxycodone.

The eight to ten week program offered at Narconon drug and alcohol rehabilitation centers provides these changes and many more. The program includes a thorough detox that returns clarity and life to a person, communications training that helps put a person back in control of self and emotions, and life skills training to help prepare a person for life after rehab.

Oxycodone addiction is treated at many rehab facilities by prescribing substitute opiates like methadone, buprenorphine or Suboxone.

Oxycontin (Oxycodone HCl) Drug Information Description, User

9/11/2016
01:02 | Olivia Holiday
Oxy drug
Oxycontin (Oxycodone HCl) Drug Information Description, User

Learn about the prescription medication Oxycontin (Oxycodone HCl), drug uses, dosage, side effects, drug interactions, warnings, reviews and patient labeling.

Common side effects may include:

Serious, life-threatening, or fatal respiratory depression may occur with use of OXYCONTIN. Monitor for respiratory depression, especially during initiation of OXYCONTIN or following a dose increase. Instruct patients to swallow OXYCONTIN tablets whole; crushing, chewing, or dissolving OXYCONTIN tablets can cause rapid release and absorption of a potentially fatal dose of oxycodone.

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration.

OXYCONTIN exposes patients and other users to the risks of opioid addiction, abuse and misuse, which can lead to overdose and death.

OxyContin (Oxycodone) Use and Abuse

5/7/2016
03:38 | Madison Holmes
Oxy drug
OxyContin (Oxycodone) Use and Abuse

Health Concern On Your Mind?

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"If you have pain that's there all the time, four hours goes by very quickly," says cancer specialist Mary A. Simmonds, MD. "If you're not watching the clock, the pain comes back. People tend not to take their pills on time. The pain builds back up, so you're starting over. It's not very good management of pain.".

Talk to health experts and other people like you in WebMD's Communities.

OxyContin (Oxycodone) Use and Abuse

12/14/2016
04:32 | Madison Holmes
Oxy drug
OxyContin (Oxycodone) Use and Abuse

It's used to relieve pain from injuries, arthritis, cancer, and other conditions. Oxycodone, a morphine-like drug, is found along with non-narcotic analgesics in a number of prescription drugs, such as Percodan (oxycodone and aspirin) and Percocet (oxycodone and acetaminophen).

Save your medicine, check interactions, sign up for FDA alerts, create family profiles and more.

Add to that a law enforcement crackdown on OxyContin, and the result is a backlash affecting legitimate use of the drug: Many chronic pain sufferers won't take OxyContin for fear of becoming addicted, and some health care providers refuse to write OxyContin prescriptions for fear of being prosecuted. If it isn't celebrities in the news for abusing the prescription painkiller, it's reports of drug-dealing doctors and overdose deaths.