How to make oxycodone more effective



Why We Take Medicines Under Our Tongue

9/10/2016
12:01 | Olivia Holiday
How to make oxycodone more effective
Why We Take Medicines Under Our Tongue

(they hit the bloodstream faster?) And is the medicine then more effective? So I figured this would make an interesting topic to discuss here.

But the "medical" answer is that absorption by your body is far more controlled in solid pill form. With sublingual delivery, you may accidentally swallow some, leading to a somewhat erratic absorption rate (see merckmanuals link below), which could produce unwanted effects. In medication, "dosage" is typically very important (that goes without saying, really). And with a solid pill, there's little to no question in terms of how much is in the pill, and how much is meant to be absorbed.

That said, sublingual delivery is actually preferred for certain medications (like cardiovascular drugs, steroids, etc), and recently, vitamins and minerals (in fact, I even came across some spray vitamins while reading about this topic, which I found somewhat humorous at first, but then thought "hey, why NOT?" -- I mean, some vitamins are literal horse pills in size, so I guess it just makes sense).

Good question -- here's the answer: When you swallow a pill, it must go through your entire gastrointestinal tract.

Comparison of the Efficacy of Oral Oxycodone and Oral Codeine in

10/11/2016
01:11 | Joshua Addington
How to make oxycodone more effective
Comparison of the Efficacy of Oral Oxycodone and Oral Codeine in

Comparison of the Efficacy of Oral Oxycodone and Oral Codeine in the This extent of demethylation has wide inter-individual variability, making codeine's Hence, the hypothesis is that oxycodone is more effective than.

Codeine has been the mainstay of analgesia for patients after craniotomy for many years. Traditionally, craniotomies were not thought to be very painful procedures, hence the use of codeine, a moderay potent opioid (when compared to morphine).

However, in recent years, it has been found that up to 70% of post-craniotomy patients have moderate to severe pain and codeine did not provide adequate analgesic relief. Many studies have compared codeine to other drugs such as PCA morphine, fentanyl and tramadol, and patients on these stronger opioids generally had lower pain scores and better satisfaction.

Hence, the hypothesis is that oxycodone is more effective than codeine in providing pain relief in post-craniotomy patients. Inclusion Criteria: Exclusion Criteria:

Example: "Heart attack" AND "Los Angeles".

The efficacy of codeine is dependent on its demethylation to morphine. This extent of demethylation has wide inter-individual variability, making codeine's efficacy as a analgesic variable. Oxycodone is a semi-synthetic opioid and is a weak agonist on mu opioid receptors.

No study has been conducted to determine the efficacy of analgesia of oral oxycodone to oral codeine.